Connect with us

Published

on

Police and protesters outside the Supreme Court in Nairobi were forced to run for their lives after they were attacked by bees. One person, a disabled beggar at the premises, was injured after being stung by the bees that started attacking them at around 11.40 am.

He was evacuated by the St John’s attendants and taken to the hospital. The police and protesters had to stand at a safe distance away from the Supreme Court gates.

An eye witness said the bees went on the rampage after their beehive was disturbed when police lobbed teargas canisters to disperse a crowd that had gathered outside the court.

This incident took place as the judges were rendering their ruling that nullified August 8 presidential elections. There have been protests by Jubilee supporters outside the Supreme Court since Monday.

SEE ALSO: I am ready to die, CJ Maraga dares Uhuru
READ: 24 ways to become a millionaire in two years

Abigael Tairo is a journalism and communications student at Daystar University on internship at Business Today. She is passionate about print media and loves writing human interest articles.You can reach her on email: [email protected]

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Politics

Police find guns at Jimmy Wanjigi’s home

The raid on the well-appointed Muthaiga address happened after police raided another house in Malindi and recovered five guns and 93 bullets

Published

on

Police have found six pistols and one shotgun at Jimmy Wanjigi’s Muthaiga home but his family says they are licensed.

The Tuesday, October 17 find comes after Monday’s overnight siege of the property on Muthaiga 44 Road that was followed by an operation on Tuesday during which police used sledgehammers and metal cutters to break into the ritzy house.

The raid on the well-appointed Muthaiga address happened after police raided another house in Malindi and recovered five guns and 93 bullets. They also searched another house in Nyali, Mombasa. They linked both houses to Mr Wanjigi.

He has since denied that the Malindi villa belongs to him. Detectives from the Special Crimes Prevention Unit and Flying Squad arrived at Wanjigi’s gate at about midday. The fortified compound is opposite the official residence of the American ambassador to Kenya.

The officers showed guards on duty a warrant and said they had come to conduct a search. Tuesday Wanjigi moved to court seeking to stop his arrest and a court stopped his arrest until September 19, granted him a Sh50,000 anticipatory bail and warned police against the destruction of the businessman’s property.

An anticipatory bail temporarily bars police from arresting a suspect. The businessman sued Police Inspector General Joseph Boinnet and DPP Keriako Tobiko.

Government Spokesman Eric Kiraithe said the raid on Wanjigi’s homes was in the interest of national security.  Pictures and video footage in our possession show officers arriving armed with rifles, metal cutters and sledgehammers.

The officers are seen struggling to smash the oak doors but not the glass, suggesting that it could be the reinforced Kevlar type.

ALSO SEE: NASA chief financier under siege

Later they are seen inside a sitting room asking “Mzee wapi mwenye nyumba? Tunajua nyinyi ni wazazi” (Where is the owner of the house? We know you are parents.), suggesting the presence of other parties not captured on camera.

On Monday, Jimmy’s father, Moi-era Cabinet Minister Maina Wanjigi drove to the son’s residence. The only civilian seen in the video is a young man on a couch. Later, a female voice is heard telling an officer “I will take you where you want to go. Where do you want to go?” Another officer in a white shirt, pistol in hand, stands calmly as another one is busy tearing down doors.

Police also searched Mr Wanjigi’s Kwacha House offices on General Mathege Drive, Westlands, Nairobi Caramel, the high end club at ABC Place, also Westlands.

Continue Reading

Politics

Court lifts ban on Nasa protests

Justice John Mativo said the suspension would be in effect until NASA chief executive officer Norman Magaya’s case is heard and determined

Published

on

The High Court has temporarily lifted government ban on anti-IEBC demos in the central business districts of Nairobi, Mombasa and Kisumu.

The suspension follows a case filed by National Super Alliance Chief Executive Officer Norman Magaya.

The court on Tuesday said the suspension would be in effect until Mr Magaya’s case is heard and determined.

At the same time, Justice John Mativo blocked the arrest and prosecution of Mr Magaya over the demos until the case is determined.

Judge Mativo issued the temporary orders on Tuesaday after the lawyer representing Mr Magaya appeared before him.

ALSO SEE: You didn’t follow the law, police tell Nasa

Mr Magaya had moved to court on Monday seeking to stop his arrest and the ban on protests against the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC).

He sued Inspector General of Police Joseph Boinnet, Director of Public Prosecutions Keriako Tobiko and acting Interior Cabinet Secretary Fred Matiang’i.

Last week, Dr Matiang’i said Mr Magaya would be held responsible for destruction of property during anti-IEBC protests.

More follows.

Continue Reading

Economy

Drawn-out vote increases risks for investors, IMF says

Bretton Woods institution avers prolonged election period has increased risks for investors and traders, in turn leading to a slowdown in economic activity

Published

on

 Kenya’s election rerun is raising the country’s risk profile among investors and weighing down already sluggish economic growth, the International Monetary Fund says.

“The prolonged election period has increased risks for investors and traders,” Jan Mikkelsen, the Washington-based lender’s new resident representative in Kenya, said in an emailed response to questions. “This in turn has led to a slowdown in economic activity.”

The IMF has lowered its 2017 economic growth forecast for Kenya, the largest economy in East Africa, to 5% after expansion slowed in the first half of the year due to a drought that led to a contraction in farming output and pushed up food prices. That would be the lowest growth rate since 2012. Rain-fed agriculture in Kenya, which supplies about a third of the flowers sold in the European Union, contributes about 30 percent to the country’s total output.

ALSO SEE: Prolonged campaigns fatigue Kenyans

The Supreme Court last month overturned President Uhuru Kenyatta’s win in an Aug. 8 election, citing “irregularities and illegalities” by the nation’s electoral body. Opposition candidate Raila Odinga, who has been demanding changes at the electoral commission, threw plans for a rerun on Oct. 26 into disarray when he withdrew from participating in the vote, saying the management of the vote “would be worse than the previous one”.

Economic growth may pick up in 2018 “assuming a return to a more normal, predictable political environment after the forthcoming elections and a modest improvement in agriculture production,” Mikkelsen said.

The IMF will hold talks with the Kenyan government on a $1.5-billion standby facility that’s meant to buffer the nation from excessive external shocks after elections are concluded. The facility ends in March and “Kenyan authorities are not expected to draw on the resources,” Mikkelsen said.

 Story Credit: Bloomberg

Continue Reading

Politics

UN experts decry rights clampdown in Kenya

They aver a pattern of police brutality, excessive use of force, consistent harassment of judges and threats to civil society has been witnessed even before the ban on protests

Published

on

Independent Expert on Human Rights Michel Forst. Photo: Jean-Marc Ferré/UN News Centre

Voicing concern over restrictions on protests as well as attacks on judiciary and civil society in the run-up to presidential elections in Kenya, a group of United Nations independent human rights experts called on the Government to honour its obligations and protect the rights of Kenyans.

“It is precisely when political tensions are high that governments should do their utmost to let people express their grievances and to protect their rights,” said the experts in a news release issued by the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

Kenya is facing a choice. We urge it to choose to uphold its constitution and pursue strengthening of its democracy, to avoid deepening political divisions and exacerbating tensions.”

According to the human rights experts, a pattern of police brutality, excessive use of force, consistent harassment of judges and threats to civil society has been witnessed even before the ban was imposed.

Under the restrictions, protests are forbidden in parts of the nation’s three largest cities – Nairobi, Mombasa and Kisumu – until further notice, protests in other parts of the country require prior police permission and organisers can be held criminally liable for any offence by any participant.

In the news release, experts noted that while some previous protests had been marred by violent incidents, they stressed that response to any violence must be proportional to the level of threat and that security forces must prioritize dialogue and non-violent means.

The presidential elections are to be held on 26 October.

The rights experts also said that there was currently an alleged climate of impunity for law enforcement officers despite the launching of several investigations, including one into the violence that followed the 8 August general election, when dozens of people were killed and many injured as a result of police action.

ALSO SEE: Nasa vows to defy Matiang’i ban on protests

In particular, they highlighted an incident on 28 September, when 27 students and staff at the University of Nairobi were reportedly injured when police used tear gas, beat them with wooden clubs, robbed them and threatened them with sexual violence.

A few days later, on 2 October, police reportedly used tear gas in a nursery in Nyalenda (a suburb of Kisumu) injuring at least three children.

“We call for a prompt, independent and thorough investigation into all allegations of police brutality,” the experts said, adding: “impunity fosters a culture of violence and mistrust, the opposite of what Kenya needs as it prepares for a repeat of the presidential elections.”

Further in the release, the experts expressed serious concern over reports of repeated attacks against individual judges and the judiciary in general and attempts to limit the courts’ role in hearing election-related petitions.

“Robust checks and balances are the prerogative of every democracy,” they said, stressing that the independence of the judiciary must be protected.

They also underscored that the role of the civil society must also be preserved and denounced fake information being circulated online on social media, seeking to denigrate human rights organizations, including members of the Kura Yangu Sauti Yangu initiative which works for free and fair elections.

“This is unacceptable and must immediately stop,” the experts said. “Over the years, we have repeatedly raised concerns with the Government of Kenya about shrinking civil society space and attacks on individual human rights defenders.”

The UN human rights experts noted above include Michel Forst, the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights defenders; Agnes Callamard, the Special Rapporteur on extrajudicial, summary or arbitrary executions; Diego García-Sayán, the Special Rapporteur on the independence of judges and lawyers; Nils Melzer, the Special Rapporteur on torture; and David Kaye, the Special Rapporteur on the right to freedom of opinion and expression.

Special Rapporteurs and independent experts are appointed by the Geneva-based UN Human Rights Council – the highest intergovernmental forum in the UN system on rights issues – to examine and report back on a specific human rights theme or a country situation. The positions are honorary and the experts are not UN staff, nor are they paid for their work.

Story Credit: UN News Centre

Continue Reading

News Updates

Politics9 hours ago

Police find guns at Jimmy Wanjigi’s home

The raid on the well-appointed Muthaiga address happened after police raided another house in Malindi and recovered five guns and...

Politics18 hours ago

Court lifts ban on Nasa protests

Justice John Mativo said the suspension would be in effect until NASA chief executive officer Norman Magaya’s case is heard...

Economy18 hours ago

Drawn-out vote increases risks for investors, IMF says

Bretton Woods institution avers prolonged election period has increased risks for investors and traders, in turn leading to a slowdown...

Politics1 day ago

UN experts decry rights clampdown in Kenya

They aver a pattern of police brutality, excessive use of force, consistent harassment of judges and threats to civil society...

Politics1 day ago

NASA chief financier under siege

Wanjigi has been associated with NASA since the Supreme Court ordered repeat a presidential election but has not attended the...

Opinion2 days ago

Withdrawal: Is Raila conceding defeat?

While Raila Odinga has been losing all his party’s key point men, Uhuru Kenyatta has been gaining, which translates to...

Politics4 days ago

Raila’s speech: We need the help of our friends

He says there are hugely pragmatic reasons to help preserve the democracy that has given Kenya the stability to become...

Politics4 days ago

Raila reveals those who pushed him out of the race

Speaking at Chatham House in London, Nasa leader says he is not retiring, accuses Jubilee of changing the rules mid...

Politics5 days ago

You didn’t follow the law, police tell Nasa

Nairobi Police County Commander Japhet Koome says Opposition alliance was supposed to have written to the police at least three...

Person of Interest5 days ago

Elizabeth Marami: Kenya’s ONLY female marine pilot

Purely because of her gender, she says she has been rejected by various companies in her quest to meet the...

Advertisement

Trending