HomeLIFEPEOPLEAtheists In Kenya President's Provocative Views On Marriage And Evil

Atheists In Kenya President’s Provocative Views On Marriage And Evil

Harrison Mumia has no time for God. In fact, he doesn’t recognize Him nor acknowledge His existence. Interestingly, Mumia grew up in a religious family: he attended church and Bible studies and was even baptized the Christian way.

As a university student, aged about 24, Mumia says he stopped believing in God or any higher power or spiritual force. “Nothing happened to make me stop believing. I wasn’t walking one day and saw the light,” he says, noting that he had just too many questions about God, morality, creation, faith for which the Bible didn’t provide sufficient answers.

He then resorted to science, which he says gave him more convincing answers that led him to become an atheist, or simply a person who does not believe in the existence of a god or any gods.

Harrison says you don’t need to believe in God to have moral values. The suffering in the world, which most religions attribute to the evil, is not the devil at work – man is the source of evil, he says.

Like other atheists, he often asks believers one question: How do you know God exists? He dismisses the biblical creation theory. His belief has seen him rise to become the president of Atheists in Kenya Society (AIK), the umbrella organisation for people who don’t believe in God.

In a country where 85% of the 50 million citizens are Christian, about 755,000 are atheists, according to Kenya’s 2019 Population Census Report.

In 2021, Mumia changed his name to ‘reclaim’ his African identity. Mumia is these days addressed as Nyende Mumia Nyende though his former name remains popular with Kenyans.

“This will be reflected on my birth certificate, passport and all other identification documents,” he said in a statement in July 2021. “It is unfortunate that white missionaries convinced Africans that African names were not good in Christianity. It’s so sad when I see Kenyans calling themselves John, Mary, Magdalene and James,” he said.

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Likewise, he said, Muslims in Africa have been convinced that Arab names are the good names, not African ones.

Mumia advocates open relationships with multiple partners. The 44-year-old digital marketer says he is polyamorous and anti-marriage, which makes his sexual life “extremely exciting”.

Harrison Mumia
Harrison Mumia: “There’s nothing like cheating. That person has just made a choice that’s different from your expectations.”

“I’m for partnerships. That’s what modern love is. In this type of relationship, if you find your partner having sex with somebody else, you make a rational decision on what to do next,” he says. “There’s nothing like cheating. This person hasn’t cheated on you. They’ve just made a choice that’s different from your expectations. People are independent. You can’t own another person.”

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In January 2019, Mumia was fired by Central Bank after tweeting on politics. CBK accused the outspoken Mumia of insubordination, disobedience and violating the bank’s code of conduct that requires its employees to remain neutral on political affairs.

A month later, Mumia was at it again, mocking God after he claimed he had secured a new job. “It’s a busy day on my first working day as a marketing manager. Just wanted to remind you’all that God doesn’t exist,” he posted.

At some point he claimed atheists were being discriminated against by employers. “Since I got fired by the @CBKKenya (matter is in Court) I have applied for hundreds of jobs. This particular job at KQ, I got to the last stage of the interview. I did pretty well, better than the others. But my atheism stood in the way of me getting a job. We face discrimination.

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