A carpenter puts final touches on a coffin at George Mburu's workshop in Murang'a town, where there's constant demand for the caskets. Photo / KNA

It is not like anyone would like people to d*e, but d***h is inevitable and once a person d**s, the only thing family and friends can do is to bury them in a coffin or casket. Casket-making business has become a necessary venture that very lucrative, sustaining many families despite the stigma ring to it.

George Mburu, a casket maker and d****r in Murang’a town, has cut a niche for himself in the coffin-making industry and is not only making a living out of it but also earning enough to invest.

With his business, which he started back in 2007, Mburu affords a comfortable life for his family and using the proceeds has purchase five hearses for hire.

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The entrepreneur says that prices of caskets vary depending on size and sophistication. A small casket ranges from Ksh7,000 to Ksh10,000 while a large size costs between Ksh20,000 and Ksh40,000. The quality and type of the material used determines the price too.

In a good month, Mburu makes a net profit of nearly Ksh100,000. “Running the business requires hard work and a lot perseverance since it has its ups and downs including being mocked and discouraged by friends and relatives,” Mburu said.

A customer can choose those on the display or place an order with their own specifications. They then make a deposit for it and pay the remaining amount on the day they collect the casket.

But like any other business, casket-making business has its challenges. These include competition from other similar businesses, misunderstandings from clients on terms and conditions as well as high costs of raw materials especially this time that the government has banned logging.

“To the community, I encourage you to venture into any kind of business as long as it is legal and adds value to someone’s life rather than staying idle since an idle mind is a devil’s workshop,” he advises.

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caption: Inside George Mburu’s coffin shop in Murang’a Town. He says running the business requires hard work and a lot perseverance since the business has ups and downs including being mocked and discouraged by friends and relatives.

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