KCB Lion Conservation
Sculpture artist and designer Peterson Kamwathi (Centre) explains the details of his carving toKCB Group Director Marketing Corporate affairs and Citizenship Rosalind Gichuru (left) and Tusk Trustee Beatrice Karanja during the official unveiling of at Kencom. [Photo/ Courtesy]

The Kenya Commercial Bank (KCB) has committed to supporting a global campaign aimed at raising public awareness on the plight of lions in Africa.

The Bank has partnered with Tusk, a leading wildlife conservation organization to launch the Lion Trail initiative.

On Wednesday, KCB Bank unveiled a life-size lion sculpture as part of the programme that seeks to raise funds to protect wildlife and their natural habitats. The sculpture is being exhibited in front of the KCB Moi Avenue Branch in Kencom House, Nairobi for public viewing.

The Tusk Trail Lion is a global art installation in support of African lion conservation which will see the installation of 47 sculptures that are displayed to the public at a selection of iconic sites across the world including Nairobi, several UK cities (London, Edinburgh and Bristol), the Hamptons – New York, Sydney – Australia and Wellington – New Zealand.

“We are playing our part to secure the survival of this iconic species in the world. We are committed to continuing to support wildlife conservation efforts and initiatives to promote and enhance lion conservation efforts across the country. Our goal is to raise awareness and the conservation of the species and its habitats in line with our climate action plan,” said KCB Group Marketing, Corporate Affairs and Citizenship Director Rosalind Gichuru.

Following the interactive sculpture exhibition, the unique works of art will be auctioned with the funds raised going to support the work of Tusk and its partners in protecting species.

According to various reports, habitat loss and degradation is the predominant threat to lions in Kenya, triggered by human settlements encroaching into lion habitats. Prey depletion because of poaching, and indiscriminate killing are other major causes of decline. Furthermore, there are concerns about the illegal trade in lion parts for medicinal purposes, and improvements in the management of trophy hunting have been recommended.

“The sharp declines in lion populations over the last decade mean there is an urgent need to address the pressures affecting this majestic species. Strengthening the coordination and collaboration amongst the lion countries in Africa partnerships with like-minded organizations is key to reaching this goal,” said Tusk Trustee Ms Beatrice Karanja-Shah.

The lion sculpture which has been designed by renowned Kenyan artist Peterson Kamwathi will be at Kencom until November 9, 2021, to create awareness on the various threats facing the African lion.

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